Is In-Line CSS Always a Bad Thing?

So I used to avoid in-line CSS at all costs.  However, there were situations like having to use display:none so that elements never show or flicker upon loading so that it can be work well with javascript built Expand or display feature. There was just no way around it unless one had to dynamically place that element via JavaScript, which is not what we always want. Loading CSS via Javascript is not recommended if CSS can be used instead. Continue reading

Does Sharing Office Space Give Business Referrals?

Definitely it can. I was freelancing for my client, who was sharing office space with a company who, if I recall correctly, owned the building. My client had extra space and let me use it. Both my client and I are in web development, and as we know, it’s recommend that every business should have a professional web presence, (a website that defines your brand, and web applications that do nifty things). The business needed a website full of features that would help grow his business, and separate selling profiles for all his employees. So, both my client and I were going to work together on this project. Continue reading

Software Used to Create Website or Applications

Back in the day when I didn’t know how to code, I was using WYSIWYG’s like FrontPage (when it existed back then), and Dreamweaver, which automatically generates the code for us. When I started to learn how to code, I mainly used Notepad for the longest time. (That’s so hardcore, right?!) Plain text editors like that don’t have any color coding or auto complete features, but some people just like its simplicity and its fast load time. Continue reading

Best Web Browser?

It’s a matter of preference (with the exception of browsers like IE), and what does the job or has the tools that you need. I’ve tried all those browser except Opera. The browser I used the most was Firefox until I tried Chrome more recently. Continue reading

To WYSIWYG or Not To WYSIWYG? That is the question.

When I first started learning how to build websites a decade ago, my project actually wasn’t a website to begin with; it was a printed newspaper. Back then “Microsoft Publisher” existed, which was a tool to put printable publishing content together (newspapers, cards, calendars), and a feature that could automatically convert the pages to web pages and uploaded through FTP. I did that for awhile until I took my introductory course to computers and learned how to use Front Page Express and Microsoft Front Page, (which also later on discontinued), then DreamWeaver, which were “What You See Is What You Get” (WYSIWYG) tools, designed for building websites. Continue reading